Saturday, June 10, 2017

Stag Party

Peryton
28 mm


Here's another model that's a bit different from my usual fare.  It's not often that I have a chance to tout fantastic(al) Latin-American author Jorge Luis Borges on this blog, but here's my chance.  The griffon-like Peryton is his creation, from his 1957 Book of Imaginary Beings.  If you read one Latin-American author ever... maybe it should be Gabriel Garcia Marquez, but Borges seems a lot more fun ;)



The figure is Reaper Bones Peryton (A Julie Guthrie sculpt!); it was a Christmas gift from my daughter :)


As usual, I'm seeing a lot of things I should improve or fix now that I've taken photos, but that will have to wait for another time...

6 comments:

  1. These wings look fabulous.
    He's actually quite good for a Bones mini, it could of course also be the result of your skills with the brush 😊.

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    1. I won't lie, there are unaddressed mold lines. Cleanup on these things is not easy. But the subject is so great I don't care :) Glad you like what I did with it, the wings are my favourite part too :D

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  2. HOW DID I NOT KNOW THAT BORGES CREATED THE PERYTON? Wow. Finding that out has made my day. It was always one of my favourite beasts from the old Monster Manual -- so odd and inexplicable (doesn't it cast the shadow of a normal human?). I once wrote a whole adventure about a benevolent alchemist who goes dangerously insane after sampling Peryton meat.
    In any case, it's wonderful that you chose to paint such an out-of-the-way monster, and I love that natural colouration that you gave it. The expression on its face also conveys a certain bat-shit-craziness.

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    1. Ha, thank you, though I can't take any credit for the choice of subject. My 5-year-old picked it off the rack after all :) She's pretty into ponies so for all I know she thought it was a pegasus ;) I'm not at all surprised you know what it is, and have gamed with it in the past, but it was new to me.

      According to online sources, Borges "created" it, like many things in his book, by citing medieval and classical sources that he simply fabricated to give it an enjoyable veneer of antiquity.

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  3. Fantastic work! I love everything!

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Thanks for commenting!